Antibody-coated iron nanoparticles make stem cell targeting damaged parts

Los Angeles Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute researchers used two kinds of antibody-coated iron nanoparticles, these two antibodies able to recognize and specifically bind to stem cells, and in vivo specific binding of damaged cells.

Antibody-coated iron nanoparticles make stem cell targeting damaged parts

MagBICE production of nanoparticles and in vitro binding properties

While stem cells may be a powerful weapon against certain diseases, but simple to use stem cells injected into the patient’s body, stem cells can not be guaranteed will be able to reach the damaged parts, and collaboration already exists in the cells there.

In order to be able to heal the targeted delivery of stem cells to the injured area, Los Angeles Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute researchers used two kinds of antibody-coated iron nanoparticles, these two antibodies able to recognize and specifically bind to stem cells, and specific damaged cells in vivo binding. When nanoparticles injected into the bloodstream, they successfully traced to the trauma section and begin treatment.

The team leader, Dr. Eduardo Marbán Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute director, said: “This result is a molecular docking by magnetic resonance imaging, we can see the iron-labeled stem cells to reach the site of injury and there begin to heal. Furthermore, by placing a magnet on the damaged heart, can iron nanoparticles closer damaged myocardium. ”

The author believes that the concept of iron nanoparticles can also be used to treat other health problems, such as peripheral blood disease and asthma. Marbán said that if future research is successful, the program is expected to human clinical studies carried out within three years.

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